2008

Notes on the Underground, New Edition

Rosalind Williams

The underground has always played a prominent role in human imaginings, both as a place of refuge and as a source of fear. The late nineteenth century saw a new fascination with the underground as Western societies tried to cope with the pervasive changes of a new social and technological order.

2007

Evocative Objects: Things We Think With

Sherry Turkle

For Sherry Turkle, “We think with the objects we love; we love the objects we think with.” In Evocative Objects, Turkle collects writings by scientists, humanists, artists, and designers that trace the power of everyday things.

2005

The Second Self: Computers and the Human Spirit

Sherry Turkle

In The Second Self, Sherry Turkle looks at the computer not as a “tool,” but as part of our social and psychological lives; she looks beyond how we use computer games and spreadsheets to explore how the computer affects our awareness of ourselves, of one another, and of our relationship with the world.

2005

Inventing America, Second Edition, Volume 1

Merritt Roe Smith

W. W. Norton presents Inventing America, a balanced new survey of American history by four outstanding historians. The text uses the theme of innovation—the impulse in American history to “make it new”—to integrate the political, economic, social, and cultural dimensions of the American story.

2005

Pedagogy and the Practice of Science: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives

David Kaiser

Pedagogy and the Practice of Science provides the first sustained examination of how scientists’ and engineers’ training shapes their research and careers. The wide-ranging essays move pedagogy to the center of science studies, asking where questions of scientists’ training should fit into our studies of the history, sociology, and anthropology of science.

2005

Drawing Theories Apart: The Dispersion of Feynman Diagrams in Postwar Physics

David Kaiser

Feynman diagrams have revolutionized nearly every aspect of theoretical physics since the middle of the twentieth century. Introduced by the American physicist Richard Feynman (1918-88) soon after World War II as a means of simplifying lengthy calculations in quantum electrodynamics, they soon gained adherents in many branches of the discipline.