The community of scholars at MIT’s Program on Science, Technology and Society bring methods from the humanities and social sciences to understanding science, technology, and medicine around the world. Our department includes lively undergraduate and graduate programs, and postgraduate training for science and technology journalists.

By bridging humanities, social sciences, science, technology, and medicine, our department seeks to build relationships among colleagues across the Institute in a shared effort to understand the human challenges at the core of the MIT mission.

What is STS?

Undergraduate Program

Graduate Program

Knight Science Journalism

 

 

 

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STS In The News

3 Questions: Why are student-athletes amateurs? MIT Professor Jennifer Light digs into the history of the idea that students aren’t part of the labor force. Peter Dizikes | MIT News Office…
Chernobyl: How bad was it? A scholar’s book uncovers new material about the effects of the infamous nuclear meltdown. Peter Dizikes | MIT News Office March 5, 2019 Not long after…
Long Island University Announces Winners Of The 70th Annual George Polk Awards In Journalism Photojournalist Larry C. Price along with contributing reporters for Undark Magazine, a non-profit online publication, is honored…

View All News

Undark

Truth, Beauty, Science.

In Pig Brains, Researchers Spark New Activity After Death

Five Questions for Mark Honigsbaum: The Scourge of Pandemics

It’s 2019. Academic Papers Should Be Free.

The Doctors Taking Birth Out of the Hospital

Breaking News

Breaking news, brisk analysis, and reader discussions at the intersection of science and society.

SPECIAL EVENTS and COLLOQUIA

Arthur Miller Lecture on Science and Ethics

Morison Prize and Lecture in Science, Technology, and Society

Benjamin Siegel Writing Prize

Center for Oral History Training Institute

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, E51-095

Summer Program: July 15-19, 2019

The Center for Oral History (COH) at the Science History Institute is proud to provide training to individuals interested in learning oral history and research interview methodologies. For one week, instructors will work with scholars and researchers who are planning or have started research that has interviewing as a core component. During this week individuals are introduced to all aspects of the interview process, including general oral history theory and methodology; interviewing techniques and performing mock interviews; legal and ethical issues; transcription practices; archiving; recording equipment and its use; data management; and other relevant topics. A portion of the week will be dedicated to interviewing skills and practice.

The Science History Institute has been conducting interviews for over thirty years, and is one of the only institutions in the United States to focus its work on oral histories of scientists. While the scope of the training workshop will focus through a STEM lens, individuals of all fields are welcome! 

 

Registration Fees

Student

Faculty/Staff

MIT

$150

$250

University Rate

$250

$350

Non-university Rate

xx

$500

Space is limited so please register early. Participants will be provided a packet that includes a reader, contact information for fellow participants, and word templates used by Institute staff throughout the interview process. Resources and schedule will be made available electronically to allow for preparation. Hard copies will be handed out on the first day. No refunds will be available after Monday, July 8, 2019.

To register, please visit: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/oral-history-training-institute-at-massachusetts-institue-of-technology-registration-56204485128

For more information, please visit:  www.sciencehistory.org/OHtraining or contact:

Samantha Blatt

Program Associate, Center for Oral History

 (215) 873-8242

sblatt@sciencehistory.org

STS EVENTS

Our People

Get to know the STS Program.

Meet Our Faculty See Publications

Faculty Spotlight: Dwai Banerjee

Dwaipayan Banerjee is an Assistant Professor of Science, Technology, and Society (STS) at MIT. He earned his doctorate in cultural anthropology at NYU and has been a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Dartmouth College. He also holds an M.Phil and an MA in sociology from the Delhi School of Economics. His research is guided by a central theme: how do different kinds of social inequity shape medical, scientific and technological practices? In turn, how do scientific and medical practice ease or sharpen such inequities?

Read more about Dwai