The community of scholars at MIT’s Program on Science, Technology and Society bring methods from the humanities and social sciences to understanding science, technology, and medicine around the world. Our department includes lively undergraduate and graduate programs, and postgraduate training for science and technology journalists.

By bridging humanities, social sciences, science, technology, and medicine, our department seeks to build relationships among colleagues across the Institute in a shared effort to understand the human challenges at the core of the MIT mission.

What is STS?

Undergraduate Program

Graduate Program

Knight Science Journalism

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STS In The News

Historian of the hinterlands In overlooked spots on the map, MIT Professor Kate Brown examines the turbulence of the modern world. Peter Dizikes | MIT News Office November 12, 2019 History…
Podcast: Lucy Suchman, “Artificial Intelligence & Modern Warfare”  
Putting the “bang” in the Big Bang Physicists simulate critical “reheating” period that kickstarted the Big Bang in the universe’s first fractions of a second. Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office…

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Undark Magazine

Truth, Beauty, Science.

Our Health Care Debate Is Focused on Insurance. That’s a Mistake.

For Cement’s Massive Carbon Footprint, Some Concrete Steps

How Do We Know When an At-Risk Species Has Recovered?

Down on the Body Farm: Unlocking the Forensic Secrets of Decaying Corpses

Breaking News

Breaking news, brisk analysis, and reader discussions at the intersection of science and society.

Our People

Get to know the STS Program.

Meet Our Faculty See Publications

Faculty Spotlight: Eden Medina

Eden Medina is Associate Professor of Science, Technology, and Society at MIT. Her work uses technology as a means to understand historical processes and she combines history, science and technology studies, and Latin American studies in her writings. Her current book project, Bones and Lives: Making and Unmaking Truth After Dictatorship (Duke University Press, under contract), studies how nations use science and technology to address histories of dictatorship and state violence and how science and technology intertwine with processes of truth, justice, and repair. More broadly her research studies the history of science and technology in Latin America and the ways that political projects shape, and are shaped by, technologies such as computers.

Read more about Eden